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  • Esbonl

    Is there any kind of software than can highlight every non-Germanic word in a text?

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  • Eðkee

    Does anyone have any idéas?

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  • Eðkee

    Anybody who has ideas for how to overbring 'armor' into Anglish, post your ideas below. I've run out of ideas.

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  • MýnÆnglishTáwk

    I think that we need to be writing ond speaking in our clean Germanish English more outside of this webside. To help to spread it further, I have been writing in it. Whenever I have had to write something, I have done it in clean English. I think that this is a good way of spreading it in the true world, since then others will read these words ond then end up speaking them more.

    It would be good to know how all of you are helping to get it outside of the Moot, so feel free to write about how you are doing it as an answer to this blog write-up.

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  • Eðkee

    Anglish word for physics.

    April 29, 2018 by Eðkee

    Þough German still uses the Latinate 'Physik,' Dutch uses (oþer þan in compounds) 'natuurkunde.' Þe wordbook here lists 'worldken' as an Anglish word for þe concept, however I þink þat a better word could be shapen.

    Also, German uses Latinate 'Mathematik' whilst Dutch uses 'wiskunde.' Our wordbook at þe moment glosses 'mathematics' as 'rimecraft', 'tellcraft', or 'reckonlore.' However, mathematics is more þan just þe study of numbers. Does anyone have a better word for it?

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  • Eðkee

    Anglish word for orphan.

    April 14, 2018 by Eðkee

    I can nowhere find an Old English word for orphan. Does anyone have an idea as to what an Anglish orphan would be called?

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  • Syemund

    Over the past few years, I have been working on my own wordbook (dictionary) of Modern English-Anglish. Using resourses such as the Anglish Moot, Bosworth-Toller, Ednew English website etc. My method is to first see if there was an Old English option for a current word, then I consider calqueing the word. As a physicist, I find it a fun challenge finding Anglish calques for the highly Latinate and Greek terms found in science.

    However, there are some words which present rather more of a challenge than others. One of which is the aforementioned: addict(ed). Which has a very specific journey from its original Latin usage:

    {Latin – Ad- 'to, up, onto' Dícere To – say, declare, fix, determine. Addicere – to bind in service to, 'to concede to}

    I mus…

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  • Nick xylas

    Anglish word for romance?

    February 18, 2018 by Nick xylas

    I'm looking for an Anglish word for romance, in the older sense of the word (as in "Arthurian romance" rather than "Harlequin/Mills & Boon romance"). The wordbook suggest "lovecraft" for romanticism, which might fit for romance in the latter sense of the word, but not the one I'm looking for; while "tale" is not really specific enough. Any ideas?

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  • Eðkee

    Þe Latin word 'acetum' became 'æched' in Old English. What would its hypothetical modern offspring be?

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  • Eðkee

    Þe Latin word 'Cæsar' was borrowed into Old English in þe form 'cásere.' What would its hypothetical offspring be?

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  • Eðkee

    In High German, Dutch, and þe Nordic tongues, 'fruit' is an early borrowing from Latin 'fructus.' If 'fructus' were borrowed into Old English, it would become 'fruht.' What would it become in modern English?

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  • Hjetland

    Help wiþ stuff

    January 16, 2018 by Hjetland

    þis may be a writting weest, but hwo comes here at least efery day or weec, so we mayen worc togeþer asetting Anglish wiþ a bounden cwitching (combined movement)

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  • Hjetland

    Deedwords or vebs

    January 14, 2018 by Hjetland

    Many folc here are writting wiþ a verb infinitive, hwich i hold hurts raþer þan helps Anglish for þis

    þe infinitive had no set one in old english or oþer early germanic speeches, but þe -en in dutch (german) and oþer germanic speech verb ending were from þe class two verbs ad it merged in all oþer germanic speeches but english. þis ending was cept in its proto germanic "state" making verbs from nouns/adjectives, byspel- hard to harden cwic to cwicen and so forþ þere were /are oþer ending cept in english not in oþer germanic speeches, such as þe umlaut-se ending, byspel clean to cleanse, blood to bless and a few oþer obsolete verbs

    Also, maybe say can/have/shall  as it is in England English wiþout þe æ, but a as in all, wh as hw (whine wine m…

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  • Eðkee

    To Player67

    January 11, 2018 by Eðkee

    Again, I wish to apologize for my admittedly raþþer brazen and sweeping changes to þe wordbook. In þe forum þere is a user by þe name of Hjetland who put forþ þat þe Anglish Wiki have a leader of some kind, a forþputting þat I agreed wiþ. I, in turn, put forþ þat I could be þat leader, if þe community here would take me and he agreed to it. In hindsight, I have been a little to bold in action þere. Now, on to þe discussion.


    As I said on your talk page, I find þe Anglish Wiki to a great idea but heavily lacking in oneness and standardization. Whilst anyone can add someþing to þe wordbook, I find þat many additions in þe wordbook to be wholely alien and unrecognizable to a newcomer, þus making Anglish someþing þat fewer folk can easily get in…


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  • Eðkee

    Alert!

    January 11, 2018 by Eðkee

    I'm letting people know þis as a warning and a call for help! I edited þe 'E' page on þe English-Anglish wordbook and þere was an editing conflict. I tried resolving it manually and it's now screwed up. I am so sorry for þis! If anyone knows how to fix it, priþee go þere!

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  • Eðkee

    Since, in Old English, þe word for 'Jewish' was 'Iudeisc,' what would þat word like if it had lasted into today's English?

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  • Eðkee

    Wordlist One

    January 7, 2018 by Eðkee

    -beaming-radiation (beamingsickness, beamingsuit, backgroundbeaming, electromagnetical beaming, alphabeaming, gammabeaming ultraviolet beaming, röntgenbeaming, beamingmark, beamingalarm)

    -beam-ray (röntgenbeam, deaþbeam, gammabeam, beamgun, shrinkbeam)

    -drake-dragon (drakefly, drakeslayer, snapdrake, Komododrake, bearded drake, she-drake)

    -craft-vehicle (seacraft, craftmanslaughter, groundcraft, skycraft, infantryfightingcraft)

    -wedlock-marriage (open wedlock, wedlockcertificate, wedlockevenness, wedlockunevenness, wedlock of convenience)

    -brimstone-sulphur (brimstonecycle, brimstoneyellow, brimstonesour)

    -sky-air (partly) (skycraft, skyport, skyborne, skycrew, skyship, skysick, skysickness, skybacking, skyfreight, skyshow, skyfield, skyspeed, s…

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  • MýnÆnglishTáwk

    There has been a lot of talk about Wiktionary not liking Anglish. I did not know what that meant, until today.

    "Hi. Wiktionary only accepts words that are actually in use by many people (see WT:ATTEST for our exact requirements). Words that you wish were used because they're "Anglish", or "more pure", or anything else, do not belong here. Similarly, etymologies may mention cognate words where useful, but rare or dialectal descendants of already listed cognates are not particularly useful. Thanks!"

    The thing is, none of the words that I put into Wiktionary were only Anglish words! They could be Anglish as they are Germanish. But they are words that are already in main English!

    So it seems that the folks at Wiktionary only let in things that they…

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  • Eðkee

    Standardizing Anglish

    January 1, 2018 by Eðkee

    Alþough I realize þat my last few blog posts have been about þis, I feel I must make a clearer point. Anglish desperately needs standardization. Þe idea of reshaping English into someþing newer þan it is is one þat I wholeheartedly am on board wiþ. However, it seems þat whilst everyone on þis site is of þe same mind, not everyone can come togeþer on what changes go and which changes stay. Þerefore, I put forþ þat we, as contributors, hold a meeting of minds in þe forum to iron out how best to standardize Anglish. I'm sure þat togeþer we can make Anglish into someþing þat folks can sink þeir teeþ into.

    It is my hope and my dream þat Anglish spreads beyond þis site and comes into more mean use. Once Anglish is standardized, þat process can be…

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  • Eðkee

    List of strong verbs

    December 30, 2017 by Eðkee

    Class 1: abide\abode\abidden, bite\bote\bitten, chide\chode\chidden, glide\glode\glidden, gripe\grope\grippen, ride\rode\ridden, rise\rose\risen, shine\shone\shinnen, shrive\shrove\shriven, slide\slode\slidden, smite\smote\smitten, strike\struck\stricken, stride\strode\stridden, write\wrote\written, wriþe\wroþe\wriþen

    Class 2: choose\chose\chosen, cleave\clove\cloven, freeze\froze\frozen

    Class 3: begin\began\begun, bind\bound\bounden, carve\corve\corven, clim\clam\clum, finden\found\founden, fling\flang\flung grind\ground\grounden, melt\molt\molten, shrink\shrank\shrunken, sink\sank\sunken, sing\sang\sung, slink\slank\slunken, spring\sprang\sprung, starve\storve\storven, sting\stang\stung, stink\stank\stunken, swim\swam\swum, swing\swang\swu…

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  • Eðkee

    My shifts

    December 30, 2017 by Eðkee

    For þe standardization of Anglish, I first put a few grammatical changes forþ.

    First: Þe inputting of a few new pronouns: yall, þou, ye, and þon. 

    -Yall shall be a second-person informal plural pronoun. Its forms are yall, yalls, and yallselves

    -Þou shall be a second-person formal singular pronoun. Its forms are þou, þee, þy, þine, and þyself.

    -Ye shall be a second-person formal plural pronoun. Its forms are ye and yeselves.

    -Þon shall be a gender-neutral þird-person plural pronoun, existing alongside he, she, and it. It is to be used in place of a gender-neutral þey. Its forms are þon, þons, and þonself.


    Second: Þe backbriging of two conjugations: -st and -eþ.

    -St shall be used only for þou

    -Eþ shall stand as a version of þe -s conjugation in sim…


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  • Eðkee

    I've worked on a reshaping of English for þree or four years and in my time working on it, I've gained much experience in þe matter and I þink þat I may be able to help þis site wiþ setting a firm system down. However, I can no longer work on it alone. I beseech anyone who may help me in work a reshaping out. For þose who wish to contact me, my e-mail is yehiyorash93@gmail.com.

    I await your answers breaþlessly! Hope to speak to you soon!

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  • Kirill Yasuda

    So I've seen the leaf of the ethels named as Borderland and White Russland, so, as a slavic speechwritlorer, I'd say that we must rename them according to their derivations, which would seem more etymologically correct (and somewhat more politically-correct maybe).



    So, the suggestion of renaming Ukraine to Borderland was suggested, since protoslavic root -krajь- means border, but in Ukrainian, word країна/krajina means country/ethel/land, and particle у/u means in/inside, so I'd suggest to rename Ukraine from Borderland to something like Insideland or Inethel.


    So, the -rus- part isn't exactly the same as in Russland, they have different historical roots. I'd suggest to rename it to White Ruthenland or White Rusynland.

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  • Hjetland

    I think we needen a Anglish leader, so mayen ye answer swiftly ( i choose myself , also partly since i am Angl-Saxon)

    We needen also a set Grammar, so i will write below my forcasting. All of the following is grounded on Early Modern English, before Colonialism asundered yet again English ( in my thought anyway)

    First and most worthy, Should/would/might/could are past of shall, will, may, should,would, could are said as shold, wold, cold. where these are spoken now, say instead may, as it has the same meaning, unless in past.

    Unlike said earlier, there must not be a verb infinitive-en ( i do not have enough time to say why though, but thou mayest ask) and no noun declension, as this is lost in some Old English brands before 1066, and was NOT…

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  • Botanikk2003

    troubleshoot

    December 12, 2017 by Botanikk2003

    trouble is from French.  I can't find a good word to brook instead. 

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  • Chris Bmann

    New Words

    December 11, 2017 by Chris Bmann
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  • Benatius

    Another word for rich

    December 10, 2017 by Benatius

    "Rike" is a middle english word, it exists in both Modern and Middle english. It also means "Empire".

    I was wondering if why didn't it enter the dictionaries

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rike#English

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  • BGTatschew

    Greetings to all! I am hight Atanas Tatchev. I am ongoingly dwelling in Bulgaria. I have wielded your outstanding work as the main wordbook in my struggle to speak and write in the sheer and elder English tongue. I have been utterly and endlessly winsome and mirthful ever since. Ye are greatly helpful and restlessly working to bring back to life the hoard and wealth of this great Germanic tongue. God bless you for that. I have forsworn any beliefs that deem the outlandish wordly inflow as more aristocratic and so on. We shall not yield the speech of yore! And I eftsay: God bless you! I hope I can wield the wordbook as I have till now done and by God's will we can bethink tocomely plots. Ye shall not belive unupheld! Fare ye well!

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  • Hjetland

    The articles

    November 17, 2017 by Hjetland

    I read that there was in early modern English plural for the, hwat þinken ye of þis

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  • Wordworthyman

    In some time (about a month or so), I will be adding a large amount of archaic, and possibly dialectal words into the English, Anglish, or Old English wordbook. I will try to make sure the word doesn't exist already in the 

    I will be working my way through the majority of the proto-Germanic nouns on wiktionary. (here's the link for anyone who wants to know https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Proto-Germanic_nouns&pageuntil=BEDAN%0AProto-Germanic%2Fbed%C4%85#mw-pages )

    I will work through to find as many words as possible for finding Anglish on wiktionary in my own time and I will also make calques for modern English words. 

    If anyone has some websites for me to use, I would very happily work through those when the holidays com…

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  • Wordworthyman

    New words and senses

    September 12, 2017 by Wordworthyman

    I was adding some new words to the Anglish wordbook and English wordbook today, and I came across 2 words online. Moonspeak (a confusing foreign language, especially Japanese or another East Asian language" and Moonrunes "Any incomprehensible writing script. Usually refers to Chinese characters, Hiragana, Katakana or any other East Asian writing script".

    Both of these words are slang, but each word gives a different sense of "(Moon) Language". One word is used specifically for the speech of a language, whereas the other word is used specifically for the writing of the language.

    Since this distinction already exists in English already and because the distinction is made in slang, it is very likely that people are be able to understand the dis…

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  • Wordworthyman

    Hi everyone, I'm Wordworthyman. I just want to hear your opinions on the future of Anglish and it's use in the modern world.

    From my standpoint, I see Anglish as mainly a concept that can be used for fun and for learning old and interesting words, but unfortunately, it can't be used much outside the Anglish community because of all the old and new words that this website uses simply confuses people unfamilar with them .

    However, I do think that there are some very strong aspects of Anglish. For starters, it brings enriches our language and brings new words in the English vocabulary. This is by far one of my favourite parts of the Anglish moot. Reviving words is fantastic and brings back the dead words from the ancient Anglo-saxons and their …

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  • Sensz416

    How to use tenses

    June 28, 2017 by Sensz416

    h

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  • Sensz416

    Grammar? cont...

    June 28, 2017 by Sensz416

    h

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  • Sensz416

    Grammar?

    June 28, 2017 by Sensz416

    h

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  • Robertlong7

    Learning Anglish

    April 6, 2017 by Robertlong7

    Greetings all, 

    So I've stumbled across Anglish and I'm absolutely amazed and would love to learn. I have quite a linguistic background so I love the idea behind the project, just curious where one should really begin? Any tips would be much appreciated. Thanks!

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  • Alfredikus

    Merry Christmans

    December 9, 2016 by Alfredikus

    Wish you a good comin' christmas everyone, Hails from Theechland.

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  • Atanasthecleanser

    Greetings

    February 27, 2016 by Atanasthecleanser

    Hail, my good brethren. I was full of mirth, when I saw that there are many other folks, whose will is to cleanse the fair English tongue. My name is Atanas, I am fifteen and I am from Bulgaria. I hope I can share my ideas with you and we can work together.

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  • NewHeresy

    I've recently adopted the inactive sub-reddit /r/Anglish (http://www.reddit.com/r/anglish/)

    For those unacquainted, reddit is a website consisting of many small user-made communities, like /r/pics, where pictures are posted, or /r/vexillology (flaglore), where flags are discussed/made.

    Anyway, I thought you guys might be interested. I'm looking for fellow moderators to help with it.

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  • EinWulf

    Note: I redd ... from OE past tense "ic red" with another "d" to be unlike the hue red.

    I took out the Anglo Saxon for this post. If yu want to see that as well, go here: http://lupussolus.typepad.com/blog/2011/08/sun-blasts-slam-into-earth-anglishanglo-saxon.html


    ---

    Anglish geþeode (yetheode, yetheude, or yethude) (translation)

    Sun Blasts Slam Into Earth

    Two blasts of energy from the sun hit the Earth's magnetic field Friday and could unsettle one or more electrical grids, worldwide-setting systems or other fulyestre-broadcast systems, kenkrafters at the Sea and Luft Theod-Dight said Friday.

    The blasts touched Earth's magnetic field in the build of fast-going "sunwind" and is blowing by the Earth, Joseph Kunches, a rume-weather kenkrafter with …


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  • Aaaar

    Dear Friends,

    English is not my mother tongue, yet maybe you will find my bungling as below somehow heedworthy. It is true that I did not learn of your being-at-the-stead until the last wordset :-).

    Good luck! Ought to be nice to hook up with you!

    A. Ehlers

    Ursprüngliche Nachricht: Answer to "Answer to 'HPL, given Planck & Heisenberg'". Freitag, den 29. 7. 2011, 15.36 Berliner Sommerzeit. A. Ehlers


    Kind Mr. […],

    Please forgive the long lag before I answer now to your couth words from two months ago. Hopefully, the named book is still with you? I took the Dollar swap worth (you wrote: 20,–) from xe.com (→ 14,– €) ... may this be right.

    Would you forbear being asked to drop a word or two from your hand anywhere in the book? You should make me highl…




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  • Xelebes

    There are many Old Anglish words that are clean words for clean awits but need many words in Anglonic to say it. One word is clean to bring forward: snīte → snyte (to blow one's nose or pick the nose.)


    The one I'm having hardship with is hrǽcan (to empty one's throat.) There is the word hork but it does not lend to talking with (like emptying one's throat to warn, to let one know,.) Is hork the word brought over from hrǽcan?


    Aftwrit: Did some hunting about for it and I found retch being the most mean follower of it. Well, there I go. I only need to find a way of putting in a talkingly falling. Maybe a belittling ending on the doer (is there any Anglish endings like that?) will do the trick.

    Aftwrit two: Snit & retch together might be the best.



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  • Gr8asb8

    Word for curse?

    March 24, 2010 by Gr8asb8

    Since the wellspring of the English word 'curse' is unknown, I put forth that 'malediction' should be calqued to 'illbless.' Are there better pickings?

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  • Vinlander

    Worldken words

    March 18, 2010 by Vinlander

    Is borrowing from German not aloud for prefixes for scientific words. I mean we needs way to make science words make sense. With a combination of compound words and prefixes

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  • To-coming otheredoneness

    I would rad against steadsetting the word 'survive' with 'overlive', because 'overlive' already has the meaning of 'to live too much', just as the words 'oversleep', 'overdo', 'overeat', mean, eachownly (respectively), 'to sleep too much', 'to do too much', and 'to eat too much. We must be careful to not to sacrifice the clarity and richness of english for 'anglishness'. Using overlive to mean survive would fordo its other meaning (to live too much), or at least create a twomeaningness (ambiguity). As an insteader, may I suggest a seperable prefex verb 'to live out', e.g. few lived the disaster out/ few lived out the disaster', not to be confused with the inseperable prefix verb 'outlive' as in 'He outlived all his siblings' which mea…

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