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Couldn't this word be translated as "ween" instead of the ones already given? [[User:Padraig|Padraig]] 16.06.2006
 
Couldn't this word be translated as "ween" instead of the ones already given? [[User:Padraig|Padraig]] 16.06.2006
 
:I say aye, says I. ~Inkstersco
 
:I say aye, says I. ~Inkstersco
  +
::Wow, what a word! Bryan [[User:BryanAJParry|BryanAJParry]] 22:55, 8 September 2006 (UTC)
   
 
== Saint ==
 
== Saint ==

Revision as of 22:55, 8 September 2006

Sauna

I knew of the word "steam room" before "sauna".

81.157.247.141 17:02, 17 February 2006 (UTC)

Indeed, as is the case with many words in English. The more english word is the one learnt first, and it is only later on in life that soem of us forget how to talk properly. I know I used to use "grown up" a lot more when I was a kid than later, when I started to say "adult"... now I say "grown up" again; I have seen the error of me ways! BryanAJParry 19:39, 17 February 2006 (UTC)


I was wondering, is it ok to use translations of outlandish words?
That's called calqueing, and can sometimes be misleading, but sometimes alright. An Anglish word must basically look like a rare English word that one simply hasn't heard of, and that means the morphemes should be used according to their English meanings. It's better to anglicise the definition than to calque the raw morphology of the word. So I think a better word would be Outlive, or Live Through. Inkstersco 20:20, 9 May 2006 (UTC)
Definitely! This is, in fact, the de facto policy. Sure, calquing is finw when it's fine. But when the resultant word doesn't really well reflect the MEANING of that word, then there is a serious problem.... :) BryanAJParry 19:03, 13 May 2006 (UTC)

Suppose

Couldn't this word be translated as "ween" instead of the ones already given? Padraig 16.06.2006

I say aye, says I. ~Inkstersco
Wow, what a word! Bryan BryanAJParry 22:55, 8 September 2006 (UTC)

Saint

Saint was in OE. BryanAJParry 06:40, 27 June 2006 (UTC)


School

I swear we've been thru this before..... "School" was in Old English. Bryan 82.44.212.6 08:13, 22 July 2006 (UTC)

Thanks, now I can stop wracking my brains :) ~Inkstersco

Save\Hain

I'm glad someone found a word for this -- but what exactly does Hain mean? ~Inkstersco

Its a Scots dialectal word. It can also mean to preserve or protect. I Believe it comes from the Old Norse word 'Hegna'. Found it in a Scots glossary and the Dictionary o' the Scots Leid gave me its origins. 83.100.181.151 19:02, 8 September 2006 (UTC)
That's great. Now that we have Hain, Stow and Hoard, all we need now is a word that means Rescue. ~Inkstersco
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